Tag Archive | "water"

Home Building Lots: Part VI

Saturday, May 30, 2009

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Title Report: Ask the realtor or seller for the name of the title company the seller has chosen. Then ask the title company for a preliminary title report before buying the land. A title report is a listing of all recorded documents found by the title company to apply to the land in question. Once you have the report, you can ask for copies of all documents listed, which may include deeds, easements, licenses, liens, property tax information, and Covenants, Conditions, and Restrictions (CC&R’s).

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Home Building Lots: Part V

Saturday, May 30, 2009

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Fire Protection: At the fire department, find out if the land is within a fire protection zone. The fire department may want a test or inspection showing if your proposed house location is close enough to a fire hydrant and the water pressure and flow available at that hydrant. If you will have a long driveway or a private road, find out what the requirements are for fire truck access and turn-around.

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Home Building Lots: Part IV

Thursday, May 28, 2009

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Water Well: If you plan to put in a well, consider consulting a water witcher (dowser) or well driller regarding the best location and the cost. Neighbors who have put in wells can tell you about their experience, though it might not apply to your particular property. Some well water is over-acidic or contains contaminants such as bacteria or sulphur (which adds a disagreeable smell to the water). There are special filters available for these problems.

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Home Building Lots: Part III

Thursday, May 28, 2009

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Utility Hookups: Dealing with utility companies is similar to dealing with government jurisdictions, except that they may be privately owned. They usually have very specific rules, specifications, inspections,and procedures that must be followed. To find out what utility companies serve your particular property, first ask the Building Department staff. They can either tell you outright, or give you some leads. Some districts (particularly water and sewer) are very small and local.

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Home Building Lots: Part II

Wednesday, May 27, 2009

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Before you buy, consider any of these factors that apply: * Survey: Is there an existing survey? Ask if the seller has one, or check with the County or City to see if there is one on file, if not for the individual property, then perhaps a neighborhood survey. In some jurisdictions, the lot corners must be marked before the land is sold, but you’ll want to see where the corners are earlier than that, before making your decision. * Reports: From the Planning Department, find out if you will need a geological hazard or engineer’s report. These are sometimes required for waterfront, steep slopes, slide zones, or other areas of natural hazard.

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Home Building Lots: Part I

Wednesday, May 27, 2009

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The first step in choosing a site is to become familiar with the area. A local real estate agent may be able to help. Before you meet with an agent, write down your preferences. Ask the agent or local residents about local weather conditions, such as fog, warm or cold pockets, or strong winds. Ask about other local conditions such as annoying noises, night lights, roads that ice up, wild fire history, pest infestations, seasonal flooding or recurrent slides. Check with the city, county or state department of transportation about road conditions. Visit prospective neighborhoods at night, as well as during the day, checking for bright lights, neighborhood activity, barking dogs, or other nighttime noises.

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Peter Asher Furniture, circa 1965

Wednesday, May 27, 2009

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Back in 1961, Peter was given a gift by his mother, the money to buy a dining room set for his apartment. At Bloomingdale’s Department Store, there was a display of reproduction medieval Spanish furniture. Peter observed that the construction was solid basic carpentry, similar to the boat building he had been doing over the previous decade. So, instead of buying the dining table, he bought tools and pine lumber and built a bed frame, a headboard, a cross wall radiator, an AC and book cabinet, a kitchen island, wall shelves, four chairs, and… a dining table. Friends were enthralled by the work and said he should do it for a living.

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